Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin (El Chapo) Guzman convicted in USA trial

El Chapo found guilty

El Chapo found guilty

Guzman leaned back in his chair Tuesday to catch the eye of his wife, who gave him a subtle thumbs-up, when the jury was discharged from a federal courthouse in Brooklyn.

The cartel leader escaped prison twice in Mexico before being sent to the United States to stand trial.

Accused Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is seen with a handgun on display during a testimony by Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent Victor Vazquez (not shown) in this courtroom sketch in Brooklyn federal court in New York City on January 17, 2019.

The jury of eight women and four men deliberated roughly 34 hours over 6 days.

NY jurors - seven women and five men - whose identities were kept secret reached a verdict after deliberating six days, sorting through what authorities called an "avalanche" of evidence gathered since the late 1980s that Guzman and his murderous Sinaloa drug cartel made billions of dollars by smuggling tons of cocaine, heroin, meth and marijuana into the U.S.

Mexican-born El Chapo, 61, showed no emotion as the verdicts were read out, but smiled at 29 year-old wife Emma Coronel Aispuro wife who put her hand on his heart.




Though other high-ranking cartel figures had been extradited previously, Guzman was the first to go to trial instead of pleading guilty.

Jurors have reached a verdict in the case of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, the Mexican druglord accused of carrying out a sprawling criminal enterprise as chief of the Sinaloa cartel.

Guzman's lawyers did not deny the defendant's charges but argued that he was the victim of government witnesses who were worse than he was.

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was elected previous year after promising a change to the deadly military-led war against drug gangs, suggesting a negotiated peace and amnesty for non-violent drug dealers, traffickers and farmers.

The legend of Guzman was burnished by two dramatic escapes he made from Mexican prisons and by a "Robin Hood" image he cultivated among Sinaloa's poor.

Guzman made a name for himself in the 1980s as "El Rapido", the speedy one, by building cross-border tunnels that allowed him to move cocaine from Mexico into the United States faster than anyone else. In 2009, Forbes Magazine put him on its list of the world's richest people, with an estimated $1 billion. Cogan said it made him "very proud to be an American". Colombian trafficker Alex Cifuentes caused a stir by testifying that former Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto took a $100-million bribe from Guzman.

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