Seattle Woman Dies After Brain-Eating Amoeba Enters Her Body

Woman Uses Neti Pot, Ends Up With Brain-Eating Amoeba

Woman Uses Neti Pot, Ends Up With Brain-Eating Amoeba

A 69-year-old woman from Seattle, Washington, died after contracting a rare brain-eating amoeba from using a neti pot to clean out her sinuses, according to the Seattle Times.

Dr Cobbs told the Seattle Times: 'There were these amoebas all over the place just eating brain cells.

When Dr Cobbs next operated on the woman, the growth had grown to the size of a baseball, and that too much of her brain tissue had been killed for medics to save her.

"We didn't have any clue what was going on", he added.

The woman had gone to the doctor for a chronic sinus infection and was instructed to use a saline irrigation to clear out her sinuses, but while sterile water or saline is recommended, she used water filtered by a Brita Water Purifier, according to a case study in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases.

"Tap water isn't safe for use as a nasal rinse because it's not adequately filtered or treated".

Doctors came across something they never suspected while carrying out brain surgery on a 69-year-old woman in the USA: a slushy mess of dead brain tissue.

Normally, an extra effort is required to bring on an infection; it can not be contracted by drinking contaminated water.

The woman's infection is the second ever reported in Seattle - the first came in 2013 - but the first fatality to be caused by it.




Amoebic brain infections are more common in warmer waters in the South, but might become more common in northern states thanks to global warming, experts say.

First, she developed a raised, red sore on the bridge of her nose.

But they would soon learn that what was inside the woman's skull was not a tumor at all.

A neurosurgeon from Swedish Medical Center in Seattle said this is a rare situation but is warning patients to be sure to follow the directions when using a Neti pot for nasal congestion, and use only boiled or distilled water. That said, the woman's case was rare; there were only three similar cases in the US from 2008 to 2017, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The other slow-acting amoeba is called Acanthamoeba spp.

Indeed, the ensuing biopsy report showed that the woman had been infected with a rare brain-eating amoeba called Balamuthia mandrillaris. "People should just go about their normal lives", he said. N. fowleri is present in Puget Sound waters and other freshwater sources, Maree said.

Cope said all three amoeba types have similar rates of prevalence, but Balamuthia mandrillaris is the least-recognized among the medical community because it is rarely documented, providing limited opportunity for research.

"He thought it looked suspicious for amoeba infection".

"From my understanding it's everywhere".

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.