Record Number Of Women Elected To U.S. House

Record Number Of Women Elected To U.S. House

Record Number Of Women Elected To U.S. House

Women hold 84 out of 435 House seats, a record number.

The record-breaking number of women on ballots across the country included Republican Marsha Blackburn who was quick to thank voters for electing her the first woman ever to represent Tennessee in the United States Senate.

MA will also be getting its first black congresswoman while Arizona and Tennessee stand to elect their first woman senators. Others, like Massachusetts' Ayanna Pressley, were political veterans.

The 29-year-old New York Democrat skyrocketed into the national spotlight earlier this year after a grassroots campaign and primary victory over 10-term incumbent Rep. Joseph Crowley.

Women have run in record numbers, and Native Americans, Muslims, Latinos, immigrants, millennials and LGBT candidates have already made history with their campaigns.

A number of women have also achieved significant firsts in their states, including Democrats Veronica Escobar and Sylvia Garcia who become the first Latina Congresswomen in Texas, and Alyanna Pressley from MA, becoming her state's first black representative in Congress.

The first Native American women have also been elected to Congress, with Democrats Deb Haaland winning in New Mexico and Sharice Davids in Kansas.




New York Democratic Congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks to supporters, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018 in Queens, New York, after defeating Republican challenger Anthony Pappas in the race for the 14th Congressional district.

Ilhan Omar, a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, is one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress and will serve Minnesota's 5th District in the House.

There are also now nine female governors, matching the record set in 2004.

VoteCast reported that more women voted for Democratic candidates than men. In many of those races, women from suburban swing areas played a decisive role in the outcome. Fifty-two percent of white women voted for Trump in the 2016 presidential election, and studies show female support for the president has held consistently, although college educated white women generally oppose Trump.

In the first major race called Tuesday night, Lou Leon Guerrero was elected as Guam's governor, becoming the first woman to do so. Democracy Now! was there with The Intercept for our special election broadcast.

That's a big part of the story of 2018: many demographic groups swinging far more Democratic than they did in 2014, a wave year for Republicans. In New Jersey, Democratic Gov. Jim McGreevy, elected in 2001, had been outed as gay while in office.

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