Onboard footage of the aborted Soyuz Russian rocket launch released

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Roscosmos has said that a faulty sensor caused the failure and that it believes Soyuz rockets will resume launching in December, when a three-person crew at the International Space Station must return to Earth.

Skorobogatov said officials are now taking steps, including putting all assembly staff through competence tests and additional training, to make sure such malfunctions don't happen again.

Executive director of Russia's Roscosmos space agency Sergei Krikalyov said Wednesday that the root of the problem was a sensor that indicated the separation of the first two stages of the Soyuz rocket.

Russian Federation suspended all launches after the accident on October 11, unprecedented for Russia's post-Soviet manned launches, that saw the rocket fail minutes after blast-off.

Referencing findings of an official inquiry into the accident, Skorobogatov said two more Soyuz rockets might have the same defect.

The crew members, Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and American astronaut Nick Hague, were then recovered in good health from an escape capsule.

But the failure is worrisome, since Soyuz is the only human-rated spacecraft now used to get people to and from the International Space Station.




Russian Federation is the only country now able to send astronauts to the International Space Station, and the accident caused it to suspend all launches until getting to the bottom of the rare failed manned launch.

Live video of the astronauts inside showed them shaking violently with vibrations caused by the malfunction.

Neither man needed medical treatment and NASA TV said both were fine.

The Russian space agency Roscosmos immediately launched an investigation into the rocket failure.

Russian rockets are manufactured in Russia and then transported by rail to the Russia-leased Baikonur cosmodrome.

Roscosmos officials explained that a malfunctioning sensor led to an issue with the separation between the two rocket stages, causing one piece of the rocket to fail to separate fully, sending the rocket into a spin and prompting the instant abort.

Following the investigation by the space experts, "appropriate law enforcement authorities" will work out who is guilty of the assembly mistake, said Roscosmos deputy head Alexander Lopatin. However, the quick return to crewed flights is likely to prove a relief to the worldwide spaceflight community.

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