Rosenstein to fly with Trump to Florida on Monday, official says

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein at the conclusion of a roundtable on immigration and the gang MS-13 at the Morrelly Homeland Security Center in Bethpage New York U.S

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein at the conclusion of a roundtable on immigration and the gang MS-13 at the Morrelly Homeland Security Center in Bethpage New York U.S

Ahead of their departure together to the International Association of Chiefs of Police Convention in Orlando, Fla., President Donald Trump said he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein have a "good relationship".

The statement comes after speculation that Rosenstein's job was at risk following a New York Times story that detailed a suggestion by Rosenstein to tape conversations between the president and DOJ officials, along with his suggestion of invoking the 25th Amendment.

Fresh off his victory of Judge Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court, President Trump doubled-down on his commitment to being the "law and order" president by suggesting Chicago could curtail gun violence by using "stop and frisk" - the famous NY law enabling officers to temporarily detain, question, and frisk civilians upon "reasonable suspicion".

Asked by a reporter if he had any plans to fire him, Trump said: "No I don't, no".

"I didn't know Rod before, but I got to know him and I get along very well with him", Trump said.

Those reports triggered an avalanche of speculation about the future of Rosenstein - and also the special counsel's investigation into possible co-ordination between Russian Federation and the Trump campaign since the deputy attorney general appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller to his post and closely oversees his work. "I look forward to flying with him".




Trump said last week that he didn't want to meet with Rosenstein to discuss the issue until Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed.

After the Times report published, Rosenstein told White House chief of staff John Kelly he would resign, anticipating the article would enrage Trump and he would be fired.

Trump also indicated that he was ready to keep working with Rosenstein.

Last year, the President signaled permissiveness toward police roughing up suspects, telling a group of law enforcement officers: "When you see these thugs being thrown into the back of a paddy wagon, you just see them thrown in, rough, and I said, 'Please don't be too nice'". Advisers had also cautioned Trump against doing anything dramatic in the weeks before the midterm elections next month.

Rosenstein assumed supervision of the investigation after Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself because of his own contacts with Russia's ambassador to Washington while serving as a Trump campaign adviser became public. Trump similarly said he'd prefer to leave him on the job.

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