ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski rips NCAA for changing rules without consulting National Basketball Association

Kobe Bryant Kevin Garnett Zion Williamson Shareef O'Neal

Kobe Bryant Kevin Garnett Zion Williamson Shareef O'Neal

The NCAA announced Wednesday that its Board of Governors and Division I Board of Directors have adopted numerous proposals, including changes to the enforcement process for rules violations and allowing NCAA-certified agents to work with college basketball players who test the waters in declaring for the NBA draft.

High school and college basketball players can also have agents.

College players can be represented by an agent beginning after any basketball season if they request an evaluation from the NBA Undergraduate Advisory Committee.

Changes in the amateur model promised by the Condoleeza Rice-led commission in the wake of the FBI investigation into shoe companies and college basketball are on the way.

USA Basketball doesn't have the infrastructure, nor interest in accepting the role of evaluating the nation's top prospects for a yet-to-be-determined number of players who'll annually be allowed to sign with agents at the end of their junior years, sources told ESPN. This change depends on cooperation with the NBA and NBA Players Association.

- Collegiate players will now be able to participate in the NBA Draft, yet return to school if they are undrafted.




- Division I schools will be required to pay for tuition and related expenses for men's and women's basketball players who leave school and return later to earn their degree.

Here's to hoping that the NCAA and National Basketball Association can work together to create new rules that make sense for everybody involved. The NCAA would establish a fund to help schools that financially would struggle to meet this requirement.

ESPN's Jonathan Givony was trying to get to the bottom of the rule changes, and he initially noted some confusion about what was going on.

One other notable change specifies the appointment of two independent groups to oversee the investigation of cases defined as "complex".

No schools were mentioned, but two Federal Bureau of Investigation reports, one in September and another in April, have identified recruiting practices that violate NCAA rules involving prospects who wound up at several schools, including Kansas.

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