Six arrested in Venezuela after drone attack

Security personnel surround Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro during an incident as he was giving a speech in Caracas Venezuela Saturday Aug. 4 2018. Drones armed with explosives detonated near Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro as he gave a spe

Security personnel surround Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro during an incident as he was giving a speech in Caracas Venezuela Saturday Aug. 4 2018. Drones armed with explosives detonated near Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro as he gave a spe

The munitions have potential to cause damage in a radius of 50 metres, and intelligence services identified the nearby streets that were used for launching the drones from a distance.

"We also know the places where they stayed in the days leading to the attack".

Earlier on Twitter, the group said it was made up of "patriotic military personnel and civilians loyal to the Venezuelan people who seek to rescue the democracy of a nation under dictatorship".

"I am fine, I am alive, and after this attack I'm more determined than ever to follow the path of the revolution", he said.

'Not only are they confessing.'

The other had a warrant out for his arrest for participating in an attack on a military barracks, the interior minister said.

Afterward, Maduro gave a defiant speech in which he accused Venezuelan opposition groups, financial backers in Florida, and Colombia's outgoing president, Nobel Peace Prize victor Juan Manuel Santos, of trying to assassinate him.

The Colombian government has denied any involvement, saying there is "no basis" to Mr Maduro's allegations.

Venezuelan authorities said Sunday that they have detained six people allegedly connected to what President Nicolás Maduro claimed was an assassination attempt, and what other leaders have deemed a terrorist attack. The little-known group Soldiers In T-shirts has claimed responsibility, saying it meant to fly two drones loaded with explosives at the president but they were shot down.

The plot was hatched at least six months ago, Communications Minister Jorge Rodriguez told the state-run Russian media outlet, Sputnik. One of the drones was meant to explode above Maduro and the other was to detonate directly in front of him, Reverol said.




Colina, a retired lieutenant in the National Guard, said there's real "fear" that Maduro and his allies will strike out against opponents.

Footage of the event showed him suddenly look up, startled mid-speech, His wife, Cilia Flores, winced after a loud bang. Dozens of soldiers standing in formation were seen to scatter shortly after the explosions occurred.

The device exploded over an area where uniformed guardsmen stood at attention in ranks, injuring seven.

Maduro appeared on national TV a couple of hours later, when he spoke about the investigation and arrests.

In an address to the nation later Saturday night, a visibly shaken Maduro blamed the attack on the "far right", and he called on U.S. President Donald Trump to hold the "terrorist group" accountable.

The foreign ministry said that "it is now a habit of the Venezuelan head of state to permanently blame Colombia for any type of situation".

On Sunday, White House national security adviser John Bolton said that the USA had nothing to do with the incident and suggested the whole thing may have been "a pretext set up by the regime itself". Bolton said USA officials would be willing to look at any "hard information" involving the attack.

Meanwhile, the Patriotic Pole coalition of parties allied with the government called for a march on Monday in Caracas to back Maduro. "I'm sure I'll live for many more years".

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