Rafael Nadal Wins 11th French Open

Rafael Nadal was understandably delighted in the aftermath of his 11th French Open title win on a historic day at Roland Garros.

Thiem was under the cosh, saving four break points in the first game of the third set before Nadal inevitably broke for 2-1.

Nadal called on the trainer to get his forearms massaged twice in the final set but even that problem failed to improve Thiem's chances of emulating fellow Austrian Thomas Muster's 1995 triumph.

Nadal is the only second player in history to win the same Grand Slam on 11 occasions after Margaret Court, who won 11 Australian Open titles between 1960 and 1973.

The Austrian is one of just three players to down Nadal on clay at least three times.

In full control of the French Open final, a rather familiar position for him, Rafael Nadal suddenly was anxious.

The Spaniard continued his extraordinary domination at Roland Garros with a ruthless 6-4 6-3 6-2 victory.




Nadal had come into the year's second Grand Slam high on confidence, after wins in Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Rome.

Thiem stayed with Nadal in the early going on a cloudy and steamy afternoon; the temperature was 77 degrees (24 Celsius), the humidity approached 70 per cent.

Despite matching Nadal forehand for forehand, Thiem was undone in the 10th game when three errors handed Nadal the opening set after 52 minutes on court. And he took the biggest of big cuts on his groundstrokes, his feet leaving the ground as he threw his whole body into them, as if the very outcome of the match - not any individual point, but the whole shebang - depended on the strength of that one whip of his white racket.

The number of titles won by Nadal on clay, extending his lead at the top of the men's Open Era leaderboard, ahead of Vilas (49) and Austria's Thomas Muster (40).

Nadal threw his arms skywards and turned to his entourage including coach and fellow Mallorcan Carlos Moya and his uncle Toni who stood down from his coaching role previous year after his nephew worn his 10th French crown. Nadal is a huge Madrid fan, and is often seen at games.

"He said "you have got to play as if you're going to be in the finals, with the same sort of aggressive play" and Andy went on to win majors". A forehand wide. A forehand into the net. Midway through the opening set, Nadal's aqua T-shirt was so soaked with sweat it stuck to him. In 112 best-of-five-set matches, Nadal has never lost after claiming the first set. Any hopes of an upset all but disappeared along with the ragged Thiem forehand which sailed way beyond the baseline.

The conditions might have contributed to the cramping that affected Nadal about two hours into the final.

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